Archive for the ‘Parties’ Category

Delectably edible baseballs and gloves

Friday, April 4th, 2014

Jules Catering celebrates Red Sox Opening Day at Fenway

As always when exploring Jules Catering’s kitchen, we felt a powerful pull toward the bakery, where, on the eve of the Red Sox 2014 home opener, something really special was going on: Shortbread cookies baked and shaped and decorated as baseball balls and gloves were being artfully arranged and packaged by Jules’ Assistant Pastry Chef, Wilmar Aristizabal.¬†

Raise your glove if you love Red Sox Home Opener shortbread cookies from Jules!

Raise your glove if you love Red Sox Opening Day shortbread cookies from Jules!

Cookies were everywhere, so we asked the obvious: How many?

“One-thousand-five-hundred.” Wilmar didn’t bat an eye.

Jules' resident "Cookie Monster" Wilmar Aristizabal offers a few of the 1,500 cookies he baked for the Red Sox home opener

Wilmar sent us home with a sampling of the 1,500 cookies he baked for Opening Day at Fenway

A simple recipe, a massive achievement

“It’s very basic,” Wilmar continued. “For the dough, just three ingredients.”¬†

Classic Scottish shortbread cookies as prepared by Jules features only high-quality sweet butter, powdered sugar, and flour

Top-quality unsalted butter + powdered sugar + flour = classic Scottish shortbread cookies from Jules

“Ginger or citrus or even savory flavorings, like cheddar, are called for in some shortbread recipes, but for Opening Day, we go the traditional route.”

Fresh, creamery butter is essential

Premium creamery butter is essential

“Something else we do is use confectioners’ sugar in the dough, rather than the granulated sugar featured in some recipes” Wilmar explained. “We do this because we believe the powdered sugar yields a more delicate and crumbly texture. Then, before we bake, we sprinkle granulated sugar on top.”

Wilmar blends the flour and powdered sugar before mixing both into the softened butter

Wilmar blends the flour and powdered sugar before mixing both into the softened butter

“Of course, simple as the recipe is, ‘stitching’ the seams on 1,500 balls and gloves¬†does¬†take time.”

We could only imagine.

These baseball gloves are NOT tough as leather

These baseball gloves are NOT tough as leather

 

Beneath the stitches is delectable crumbly shortbread coated with egg-white and powdered-sugar icing

Beneath the stitches crumbly shortbread is coated with egg-white and powdered-sugar icing

What quantities are involved in a recipe for so many cookies?

Large¬†quantities!” Wilmar reached for a calculator. “In total,¬†this 1,500-cookie batch required more than 56 lbs of butter, 71 lbs of flour, and 15 lbs of powdered sugar. But because I prepare only 200 cookies at a time, it’s manageable. I don’t break my back.”¬†

So if 269 Cookie Monsters were to occupy each of the 269 seats atop Fenway’s “Green Monster,” you could feed–?

“From this batch of shortbread, we could offer about 5-1/2 cookies apiece!”

Fenway Park’s “Green Monster” is poised for Opening Day

Why “short” and why “bread”?

A jazz musician we knew used the term “short bread” to characterize low-paying gigs, but we wondered about the culinary meaning of the word. According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the short in shortbread refers to “butter or other fat used in baking‚Ķ ‘shorten’ in the sense of ‘make crumbly’‚Ķor ‘easily crumbled.'”¬†And the bread¬†in the name¬†was used by early Scottish bakers who fought to classify shortbread biscuits (ie, cookies) as a “bread,” in order to avoid paying a government tax placed on biscuits.

A Scottish creation that dates back to the 12th century and popular ever since throughout the United Kingdom, shortbread is said to have been refined and popularized by Mary Queen of Scots, who, at age 44, was beheaded for treason for allegedly plotting the execution of her cousin, Queen Elizabeth I.

We wonder whether Mary Queen of Scots, found guilty of plotting the assassination of Queen Elizabeth I, dined on shortbread for her last meal

We wonder whether Mary Queen of Scots dined on shortbread for her last meal

Queen Mary’s favorite shortbread was cut into triangular “Petticoat Tails,” so named because the triangle wedges cut from the circle of dough were the same shape as the pieces of fabric used to make an Elizabethan petticoat, and the name for a pattern back then was ‘tally.’ Queen Mary’s preferred ‘petticote tallis‘ was flavored with¬†caraway¬†seeds.

Other fascinating facts about shortbread:

  • Because shortbread ingredients were expensive, this treat was often reserved for special occasions, notably¬†Hogmanay, the Scottish New Year‚Äôs Eve.
  • The Scottish custom of eating shortbread on New Year‚Äôs Eve arose out of an ancient pagan ritual.
  • In Shetland, a decorated shortbread was traditionally broken over a bride‚Äôs head before she entered her new home.
  • In the UK, January 6 is National Shortbread Day.
  • Southerners in the US traditionally used brown sugar when preparing the dough; in Kentucky, shortbread cut into squares or wedges and topped with strawberries and cream is known as “Derby Cake.”
Using Jules' classic shortbread recipe we shaped and cut Mary-Queen-of-Scots-style "Petticoat Tails"

Using Jules’ classic shortbread recipe we shaped and cut Mary-Queen-of-Scots-style “Petticoat Tails”

Shortbread cookies are not just for Red Sox Opening Day

Jules’ Director of Business Development, Jenny Willig, popped down into the kitchen to give us a little backstory on “the themed cookies Jules prepares for summer ice-cream socials, winter holiday events, and any number of other ‘show-appreciation-for-the-guests’ -type occasions Jules caters throughout the year.”¬†

Jenny Willig, standing with a package the Jules sales team assembled as part of the bid process for today’s Opening Day event, says, “Pitching and ‘catching’ Jules’ food and service is a win-win for all involved.”

Jules’ Traditional Shortbread Recipe (Serves 8)

2 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter (room temperature)

1. Whisk the flour and powdered sugar together in a medium bowl. In a large bowl, beat the butter with a wooden spoon or an electric mixer until light and fluffy.

2.¬†Using your hands, press the dough into a ball. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured counter and knead until it is smooth. Press the round of dough on top of a piece of parchment paper and, with a rolling pin, roll out until about ¬Ĺ-inch thick. Define a circle by cutting around the circumference of a pie or dinner plate.

3. Transfer the parchment paper with rolled-out circle of dough to a baking sheet. Crimp the edges, then poke the dough all over with a fork and sprinkle evenly with granulated sugar. Score the circle of dough into 16 wedges. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate the dough for at least 20 minutes. (Overnight also works.)

4. Adjust an oven rack to the top third of the oven and preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Bake the shortbread until pale golden brown, 40 to 45 minutes.

5. Transfer the baking sheet to a wire rack and, while the shortbread is still warm, use a sharp knife to cut through the scored marks and separate the wedge-shaped Petticoat Tails. Let cool and serve.

We love the way these cookies crumble

We love the way these cookies crumble (again, quality butter and powdered sugar are key)

World champ cookies, a championship team

Whether they win or lose, Jules loves the Red Sox. 

Grateful fans gather in the shadows of the Green Monster, November 2, 2013

Grateful fans gather in the shadows of the Green Monster, November 2, 2013

 

"Did I hear 'World Champion Cookies'?!"

“Did someone say ‘World Champ Cookies’?!” (Boston’s ace was all ears)

The best Sox are the Red Sox

Three days ago at the White House, Barack Obama (a Chicagoan and a White Sox fan), wished David Ortiz and other members of the Red Sox good luck this season. “May the best Sox win,” he smiled.

Big Papi snaps a 'selfie' with the President, who invited the Red Sox to the White House April 1

Big Papi tweets a ‘selfie’ with the President, April 1

“Shortnin’ Bread”–Music to munch by

Finally, because there’s very little we enjoy more than sampling shortbread while tapping our toes to great music, here’s Mississippi John Hurt playing and singing “Shortnin’ Bread.”

Interestingly, the shortnin’ bread lauded in this song may actually have¬†been¬†bread–ie, a quick bread made with shortening–rather than the shortbread cookies featured in this post. But that’s a topic for another time!

Image Credits:
Green Monster Fenway Park, Bernard Gagnon: Wikimedia Commons
Mary Stuart Queen of Scots, Francois Clouet: Wikimedia Commons
Big Papi Tweets Selfie with the President: David Ortiz, Twitter
All other photos: Liz Muir 

 

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Helping neighbors build communities–Jules celebrates Boston LISC and Mayor Menino

Sunday, March 31st, 2013

In every sense of the word it was a 'full' program

When the Greater Boston Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) contacted Jules Catering’s Mimi Deignan and asked if Jules could pull together a high-profile fundraiser for 450 guests, most of whom would be arriving hungry and thirsty directly from work and descending more or less in one fell swoop upon the¬†Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology’s¬†historic lobby and auditorium in Boston’s South End, Mimi didn’t hesitate:

“Yes, we can!”

The Mayor, looking reassuringly robust, arrives!

“And Jules will make it really special,” Mimi was quick to add, “not just because LISC is an organization that has made such a positive difference in our community and its 30th anniversary is a landmark event, but because among the hundreds of colleagues, activists, and friends of the organization attending will be Boston Mayor¬†Tom Menino, the president and CEO of the Boston Foundation,¬†Paul Grogan, and WBUR radio host Tom Ashbrook, as well as¬†many¬†other wonderful people who qualify as “luminaries” because they work so hard to make¬†Boston a better place for¬†all¬†of us to live.”
 

Boston LISC believes in opportunities for all

The notion that everyone has the right to live in a safe, prosperous neighborhood rich with opportunities is a core belief of the¬†Local Initiatives Support Corporation, and for 30 years the Greater Boston office has been providing funding, financing, and technical assistance to¬†help transform disadvantaged neighborhoods. An excerpt from Boston LISC¬†Executive Director Bob Van Meter’s March 15¬†Boston Globe Op Ed,¬†Three Decades of Rebirth and Renewal,”¬†captures the gist:

“Today, Boston is a safer, healthier and yes, prettier place, where neighborhoods once written off as hopeless now thrive. LISC didn‚Äôt know how to make that happen alone, but it knew how to bring together the people who could: philanthropists, bankers, community leaders, businesses and, maybe most important, the residents themselves, who always know best what their neighborhoods need to get back on their feet.”

Hugs all around--and cheers to good neighbors!

Clearly, Greater Boston LISC has a nurturing vision, and when it comes to supporting those who nurture, Jules has a vision, too! 

Jules Catering handles large parties with ease

Jules is fastidious about shrimp preparation

“You’re right,” Mimi told us, when we marveled at how great the hors d’oeuvres tasted, how skillfully food and drinks were served and replenished, and–bottom line–what a good time was being had by all.

“You can’t pull off an event like this without meticulous advance planning and superb organization,” Mimi elaborated. “Nor would it be possible if we couldn’t absolutely rely on each other to tackle individual tasks, while also working together as a seamless team. Congenial bartenders quickly responding to throngs of thirsty celebrants, tray-bearing servers wending their way through party guests deeply engaged in conversation, chefs who immediately acclimate to off-site kitchens with all their particular quirks–only when every member of a team pulls together can a party like this succeed.”

Incredibly, we observed, the Jules team makes it look easy.

“That’s because we’re professionals. Jules handles big (and small) parties with ease.”

Jules' take-charge Party Chef Alex Restrepo sends Honey-Lime Shrimp with Citrus Aioli on its way

Longtime Party Chef Alex Restrepo oversees preparation and presentation of food, in this instance, serving trays for passed hors d’oeuvres, as well as large platters for stationary food displays.

While we paused to admire the Franklin Institute's Charles E. Mills 1910 murals, Jules' Robyn Michel gets to work

LISC celebrants occupied every nook and cranny of the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology’s meeting space. Above and just below, guests mingle in the airy, marble-floored lobby¬†with Franklin-themed murals painted by Charles E. Mills (1856-1956).

We were struck by how unobtrusively Server Maggie Caro (and her colleagues) offered hors d'oeuvres to a packed house

Jules’ Party Planner Mimi Deignan (shown passing between the balloon-festooned reception area and a food-laden table, just above) was in constant circulation, as were Jules’ servers. Passed hors d’oeuvres included:

Honey-Lime Shrimp with Citrus Aioli
Sesame Chicken with Soy Cilantro
Goat Cheese and Sun-Dried Tomato Tartlets
Beef Tenderloin Crostini with Caramelized Onions

Some stationary food displays were all-vegetarian

Vegetarian offerings included Jules’¬†Meze Platter, which featured:

Grilled Eggplant
Baba Ghanoush
Taboulleh
Vegetarian-Stuffed Grape Leaves
Hummus
Homemade Pita Chips and Sesame Seed Lavasch

Catering large parties is 'a piece of cake' for Jules

And, just above, in the Franklin Institute’s dual-purpose auditorium/ballroom, which we were were told is a scaled-down replica of ¬†Boston’s¬†Symphony Hall, Event Sales Manager Brooke de Moraes¬†makes certain that every guest will enjoy a piece of Anniversary Cake.

We never have to ask the always gracious Mimi Deignan to say 'cheese,' because she's always smiling!

“Jules likes nothing better than to support good causes,” Mimi told us, as we bid adieu to the Mayor and gathered our things to go. “To take good care of those who take good care of others is enormously satisfying–not just for those of us working this party tonight, but for all of us at Jules.”¬†

Looking ahead, Jules will leap at every opportunity to cater to our 'Neighborhood Mayor'

Photo Credits: Liz Muir

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Jules welcomes Bobby and Brooke

Thursday, March 21st, 2013

Not long into our conversation with Jules Catering’s newly hired Event Managers, Brooke de Moraes¬†and Bobby Spano, we experienced a moment of cognitive dissonance: Did the numbers add up? Could these fresh faces really and truly have (in sum) clocked 30 years in the catering industry?

In total, Event Managers Brooke de Moraes and Bobby Spano offer 30 years of catering experience!

“I‚Äôve always been in catering–or at least since I was 16,”¬†Bobby offered.

I started at 14!” Brooke laughed.

Hmm… We did the math… Jules Catering’s new hires really are¬†old hands–with decades of experience between them.

So you found your path into catering very early, we prompted. Now, fill us in on how and why and where you began.

Brooke: “Primarily I’m someone who likes to help plan”

Raised on Martha

“I grew up in¬†Longmeadow, a cute little town south of Springfield, where my mom threw a lot of dinner parties. Every month she eagerly awaited the next issue of “Martha Magazine” (that is, Martha Stewart Living), with the result that many of those tasty and reliable recipes landed on our table. My mother tried¬†everything. She was always cooking new things, and I enjoyed it. (Maybe I enjoy eating a little too much!) ¬†I think this is how it all started for me.”

What then?

“Throughout high school and college I worked for an off-premise catering company near Springfield. At 14 I was a server. Later, I learned to bartend. And some of the time–even as early as age 17–I was actually running the show, managing weddings and tackling some other quite complex events. It was fun, and I learned a lot.”

Brooke de Moraes

“Before joining Jules this winter,¬†I worked as a Catering Operations Manager at a Boston-area caterer.”

“A stand-out event for me there was a half-million-dollar wedding. I treasure this memory, not so much because my clients had tremendous resources and because the wedding turned out to be perfect (it really did!), but because¬†I became so fond of this family. They were so down to earth, so grateful for the help I was able to provide as we moved through the planning process and then the wedding itself–I’ll just never forget it.”

“As is the case with all of my catering experiences, I value the relationships. Even when there are no events on the horizon, people tend to stay in touch!”

Now that you’re with Jules, what’s on your calendar?

“Well, this afternoon I’m meeting with a bride and groom and a representative from the Charles Riverboat Company,¬†for a tasting. We’re planning a June 1 wedding out on Boston Harbor. (How romantic is that?!) I’ve been married for nearly four years, and my low-key, backyard wedding was just what I wanted it to be. But if I had to do it all over again, I might opt for a nautical setting.”

“I don’t want to give the impression I do only weddings (that’s more Bobby’s bailiwick), because I’m very busy with a number of other projects, including staffed events for corporate clients.”

“And I’m thrilled to have joined the Jules team. I have a lot of experience planning and managing events, but one of the really nice things I’m beginning to appreciate about this new situation is that I’m able to turn to longtime event sales managers–people like Lynn and Jenny and Paula, for example–and brainstorm with them about how to remedy issues. This is great, because successfully planning and managing a catered event has a lot to do with recognizing a¬†wide variety of challenges–and then being able to “invisibly” deal with them. By “invisibly” I mean: create the reality for clients that their event represents no challenge at all!”

Is there anything else you would especially like Jules clients to know about you?
 
“Maybe that while my job title is ‘Event Sales¬†Manager,’ I don’t think of myself as a sales¬†person. Primarily I’m someone who likes to help plan.”
 

 

Bobby: “I guide the bride”

Bobby Spano

What about you, Bobby? Where did you begin?

“My first job was dishwasher, then server, then bartender, then manager. I worked my way up, which is of course great training for anyone in catering, because it exposes you to everything. On top of that, my mom was a catering director for a hotel on the South Shore when I was growing up–and she’s still in the industry today. She sells bands for weddings…music.”

Sounds like your mother was influential.

“Ours was a¬†big party house–it still is–particularly in the summer when we all gather around the pool. My father’s family is Italian, my mother’s is Greek–so while she serves grape leaves and all sorts of delicious things, my dad cooks on the grill.”

Other influences?

“I love to dine out. This is also true for Brooke, I know, because it’s important for us to keep tabs on what‚Äôs going on, observe new trends, and then bring the best elements of what we experience back to our clients. “Every weekend I watch the Phantom Gourmet,¬†and I was¬†obsessed with Downton Abbey. TV like this is fun, but it’s also educational. I learned a lot about service and place settings–the way silverware is properly set–from watching Matthew and Lady Mary’s ‘Masterpiece‘ wedding!”

You’ve been here for not quite two months. What were you up to before you joined Jules?

“I went to law school, while simultaneously working at Wildflour Caterers, in Milton. At Wildflour my initial, exclusive focus was weddings and other social events. Later, I expanded into corporate catering. Still later, when I got out of law school and didn‚Äôt immediately find a job as an attorney, Wildflour promoted me to Catering Director and offered me a raise. So I stayed on for another year, and I was comfortable. But when my former (and once again current) colleague Kim Gericke alerted me to an opening here at Jules, I followed up. And here I am today.”¬†

Now that you’re with Jules, will you turn your attention to any particular types of events?

“I’ll be involved with a little bit of everything, but because I love to plan weddings–and because I have particular expertise in this area–weddings will be my special focus. Large, small, traditional, cutting-edge–I stand at the ready to help plan and manage them all.”

“A trend I’m noticing among my friends who are getting married is toward the back-yard celebration, rather than the fancy hotel wedding. These smaller events are fun for me, because when I’m planning a wedding in someone’s home, I’m working with more of a blank canvas. The process can be especially creative.”

“An unforgettable wedding I planned and managed when I worked at Wildflour involved a hurricane! Due to the absolutely crazy weather, we had to change the time of the wedding twice in 48 hours. ‘No, no, no…don‚Äôt come at 4…come at 5!’ There was an outdoor tent, gale-force winds, windswept rain, and¬†mud–and when the bride came to me feeling a little stressed out I simply told her, ‘You gotta have fun. You gotta enjoy yourself because everyone here is either family or friends and we have collaborated on an amazing wedding.’ And she did–she had a great time.¬†Everyone did. Later, at WeddingWire, the bride posted a very positive review, noting not only how wonderful the wedding was, but thanking me for being so friendly and accessible and respectful of the budget, throughout the process. Feedback like that always makes me feel good.”

What else would you particularly like Jules clients to know about you?

“Maybe that because of my law-school background I’m very detail oriented, while also being easy to work with…easygoing. My job is to guide the bride, and so these are qualities that serve me well as I help plan weddings.”

“Once–for just a moment–I thought I’d let down the bride. Her wedding was at the¬†EpiCenter, in South Boston, and when she stepped inside and started to cry, my heart sank. Then, to my great relief, she sniffled and smiled: ‘It‚Äôs better than I’d ever imagined it would be!'”

“It’s moments like these that make me love my job. Planning a wedding is a lot about trust, about building relationships, so when the wedding is over and we all move on it can feel a little bittersweet.”

 

Photo Credits:
Portraits of Brooke and Bobby: Liz Muir
Magazine Cover: Martha Stewart Living
Lisianthus Stems: Liz Muir
Wedding March: Boston Public Library, Wikimedia Commons
Garden Sign: Liz Muir 

 

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The ‘anatomy’ of Jules-catered parties

Monday, January 14th, 2013

How does Jules cater parties? With the help of Jules’ Director of Business Development, Jenny Willig, we began to¬†count the many ways.

A food station before party-time; notes in bowls are one way the kitchen and 'front of the house' communicate

“I’m glad you asked about this,” said Jen, “because my sense is that¬†some¬†of our clients so strongly associate us with one particular type¬†of event that they may not fully appreciate Jules’ wide-ranging capabilities.”

We can guess at some of the distinctions, we offered. How would you break things down?

Party variables

“When partnering with individual clients and working through the event-planning process, we factor in¬†a number of basic elements, including:

  • Drop-Off Versus Staffed Event
  • Venue Location
  • Logistics of Event (plated, buffet, alcohol served?)
  • Food Display/Presentation

Jules also offers simple or elaborate flowers, table decor, and other decorations

What about menu options? we wondered.

“Culinary preferences and menus¬†are of course¬†the heart and soul of Jules Catering, but this is such a vast topic, let’s focus on food another day.”

Over the course of 2012 we captured in photos at least some of Jules’ wide-ranging capabilities–

“Let’s see what you’ve got.”

Drop-off

Every day, the five vans in Jules’ fleet are loaded up and sent on their way to drop off food in and around Boston. On a typical weekday, Jules makes about 45¬†drop-off deliveries.¬†

Jules Catering drivers triple-check lists before loading, driving, and dropping off

Jules drops off hot and cold food to corporate and academic institutions, as well as to private homes.

Staffed Events

“Drop-off is a big part of Jules’ business,” Jenny continued, “but some parties require–and some budgets allow–on-site chefs and and/or bartenders and/or waitstaff.¬†Whatever¬†the budget and customer preferences, Jules’ expert sales team works hand in hand with clients to ensure successful events, and–when a staffed party makes sense–Jules has at the ready a full-service team.”

Jules Party Chefs Takes Charge in Private Homes

Jules' party chef Alex preps appetizers in a client's home kitchen

Party staffer Gus rolls up his sleeves for party prep in private home

Jules Party Chefs Prepare Food On-Site in Corporate Kitchens

Some Jules-catered events call for on-site party chefs

 Jules Waitstaff Set Up Wine Bar in Private Home

Ready for bubbles? Greg and John are ready to pour!

Jules Offers Full-Service Bars and Expert Bartenders

This wedding party featured a full-service bar; Anita is ready to mix and pour, Daniela is ready to serve

 

Venue

“What are the desired atmospherics? This is one key¬†variable we take into account when selecting a venue or adapting to a given space,” Jenny continued. “Of course the good news is: Jules can create a party atmosphere in any location.”

Large Off-Site Venue
(Cocktail Party)

Jules staff prepare for a large off-site party that featured food stations, bar, and cafe tables

Private Home
(Cocktail Party)

Jules caters parties--large and small--in private homes

 Corporate Venue
(Holiday Cocktails, Dinner, and Candy Station)

Candy station set-up for an on-site corporate holiday event

Corporate Venue
(Small-Scale Holiday Brunch)

John, a regular on Jules' waitstaff team, awaits arrival of families for corporate holiday brunch

 Tent
(Wedding Catered at  Private Home)

Members of the Jules team strategize next steps in wedding-party set-up

 

Food display and presentation 

“Jules loves a party,” Jenny continued, “and we pride ourselves on the quality and ever-changing variety of our passed hors d’oeuvres, our buffet offerings, and our plated meals.”

Passed hors d’oeuvres

Hors d’Oeuvres (Almost) Ready to be Passed and Served

An on-site party-chef arranges Coconut Chicken with Pineapple Salsa on a Nambé (leaf-shaped) platter

Hors d’Oeuvres Can Be Prepared and Passed in Private Homes

Jules prepares to pass hors d'oeuvres

Waitstaff Pass Hors D’Oeuvres in Large Venue¬†

Large cocktail party fundraiser featured passed hors d'oeuvres

Food stations

Many parties Jules caters feature help-yourself food stations. Parties like these may or may not also feature passed hors d’oeuvres.

Food Station in Private Home
(Adjacent Buffet Table Is Reflected in Mirror)

This party in a private home included a buffet (reflected in mirror) and food stations

A simple, but elegant, cocktail party display

Stationary Food Displays in Large Reception Area

There's an art to setting up stationary food displays

Jules Catering dessert station--before setup

Jules Catering dessert station--after setup

Buffets

“Of course a variation on the food station is the full-fledged buffet table,” Jenny explained. “Even buffets designed for large groups¬†can be minimally staffed.”

Buffet Setups in Private Homes

An especially splendid Jules-catered cocktail party buffet

An extra-special Sunday brunch buffet

Buffet Setup for On-Site Staff Holiday Party

This holiday buffet for 90 guests was capably managed by just two staff members

Holiday Office-Party Buffet in Private Home

Some of Jules' clients opt to host 'office parties' in private homes

 

Jules really IS a “full-service” caterer

So, we challenged Jenny. What if we were to say we were ready to party and wanted to brainstorm our options?

I would say, ‘Give Jules a call!’ “

Jules-catered events run the gamut from dinner for two at home to off-site events for 2,000

Jules Catering Order Sheet for cocktails and hors d'oeuvres and dinner

Jules can also help arrange for music

 

Photo Credits: Liz Muir

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Jules provides ingredients for corporate kids’ CookieFest and holiday family fun

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

Jules’ ‘Cookie Maestro’ enjoys a day off

When, a few days ago, we crossed paths with Jules Catering’s Assistant Pastry Chef¬†Wilmar Aristizabal¬†outside Jules’ fragrant kitchen, a flurry of questions rushed to mind:

  • Where is your chef’s jacket?
  • Why aren’t you rolling out cookie dough?¬†
  • Why don’t we hear the beep-beep-beep of your oven timer?
  • What in the name of Ebenezer Scrooge are you doing out here?!

We were baffled by this encounter because we knew that during the month of December, alone, Wilmar is charged with preparing thousands of holiday cookies, many requiring elaborate decoration.

“Yes,” Wilmar smiled. “This time of year I’m at least as dedicated to my work as Santa’s most diligent elf.¬†But this morning, I get to take it easy.¬†Sure, I did the baking. But that was yesterday. Today, I’m relieved of my usual decoration-duties, because…

Jules provides the basics: cookies, easy-to-use icing dispensers, M&Ms, and multifarious sprinkles and jimmies

“…the kids are in charge!”¬†

“Cookies without borders” may set a trend!

“Food should be fun”

So declared chef, restaurateur, and cookbook writer¬†Thomas Keller, and Jules couldn’t agree more. Another true believer in ‘the fun factor’ is Joyce¬†Georgakopoulos, Director of HR¬†at Murphy&King, PC,¬†Counsellors at Law, who explained that children’s parties at the firm are a holiday tradition for at least 30 years–and that for the past 10+ years, Jules Catering has provided both the ready-to-eat and decorate-your-own holiday fare.

Fresh-baked cookies from Jules

 

 Jules provides the edible tools, kids create cookie art

Jules’ longtime party chef Alex Restrepo knows a thing or two about the fine art of cookies, so–given that it was Wilmar’s day off–we asked Alex to weigh in on the creative swirl around us.

What follows is a small sample of Alex’s commentary….

While awaiting Santa’s hi-rise arrival, Party Chef Alex Restrepo weighed in on cookie art

 

“I applaud this young artist’s¬†careful approach to the composition of ‘the cookie canvas,’ and how she hearkens back to the Pointillist¬†tradition.”

“Her use of strong diagonals is superb!”

 

¬†“Here we see a work in progress…a wonderfully lush evergreen…perhaps part of a larger landscape. And my guess is that before the ‘paint’ dries, she may work in some sparkly texture.”

 

“Talk about texture! When I admire this masterpiece,¬†Pollock’s¬†early drip paintings¬†come to mind.”

 

“It’s hard to tear myself away, but I’ve got to get back to the kitchen. But before I go I must say that¬†this particular cookie (the artist’s self-portrait), like all of today’s cookie creations,…

¬†“…makes me smile.”

It’s not just about kids

Family fun is of course about parents, too, and Jules likes nothing better than to cater family parties, not only in the workplace, but beyond. Jules’ wide-ranging events involving children include family reunions, anniversary parties, birthdays, and–when warm weather returns–barbecues and picnics.

Photo Credits: Liz Muir

 

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