Table talk

April 11, 2012

Anita Baglaneas and members of the Jules team set a buffet table and strategize party flow.

“A table should enhance the food, not dominate or distract,” Anita replied, when we asked about her approach to setting a buffet table. “The simpler the better.¬†Like a frame that properly sets off a painting, a table should promote the food’s natural good looks.”

What about this, we wondered, peering at the organic-seeming synthetic, just below…

Exotic mushrooms? Fragile seashells? No, this is a closeup view of a table runner.

“What drew me to the table runner,”¬†Anita enthused, “was the texture and color. Once I had this in hand, ideas began to percolate. And when I visited the Boston Flower Market and lucked into rosy crabapples and mini-pumpkins on the vine, it all began to come together.”

Crabapples and mini-pumpkins await arrangement.

Beyond all this, the addition of complementary-colored green figs “really jazzed things up.”

Green figs accent the warm colors of copper, crabapples, and mini-pumpkins.

“One of the advantages of this arrangement,” Anita added, “was that fragrance wouldn’t be an issue. The scent of fresh flowers can sometimes compete in an off-putting way with the food.”

When we expressed interest in the foundational elements used to support this buffet, Anita said, “I like to add vertical interest because no matter how beautiful the food, if it’s presented at all one level it can look unappetizingly¬†flat!”

The underlying structure in any buffet table setup is key.

“This is really basic,” she continued ” but presenting food at different heights makes it ¬†more accessible to guests and, when artfully arranged, varying heights can add to the visual appeal.”

Here, at last, the table is ready to party!

Photo Credits: Liz Muir

 

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